What We Write About — We Care About

Writing is much more than words, but uses words to their full potential to make a concept tangible, almost sensory in its delivery—touching not only the intellect but affecting the senses. Writing with lack of substance, with no pith, is an apple without a tree: it has fallen to the ground and become something unrecognizable, moldering and full of holes. It still has promise, in the form of seeds which may germinate into their full potential as a fruit tree—yet, a fresh, crisp apple which is ready to be pulled from the tree imparts its flavor and nourishment at the first bite. The moldering apple is a rough draft or uninspired, poorly written piece, which has (or had) potential, whereas an inspired and strongly developed piece will be full of flavor, rich with meaning.

Writing is contingent upon inspiration, whether it is the reader who is inspired by the writer, the inspiration behind writing a story, or writer's block due to lack of inspiration. This said, we find that our work is at its best, and is most appreciated by others, when we focus on those things which move us deeply, inspire us, or require us to walk in the shoes of other sentient beings. (A dash of curiosity is necessary to complete the recipe.)

Greyscale Landscape

Living with Meaning...

Writing with Meaning

Health + Healing

With a background in therapy, yoga, nutrition, and bodywork, we perceive the body as an integrated whole—not a sum of parts. Our writing on integrative, complementary and alternative health is informed by years of experience in home and clinical settings, seeing clients one-on-one, and working with families and caregivers to provide long-term support.

 

Areas of particular interest include: 

  • Quality of life, whole-person care

  • Chronic pain management

  • Neurological conditions

  • Neuropalliative support

  • (dis)Ability

  • Healing, medicine in non-western / non-allopathic traditions

  • Yoga Therapy

Earth + Nature

The mental, physical, and spiritual benefits of being in nature have been written about since time immemorial—from philosophers to medical practitioners—in every tradition, in every part of the world. No small surprise that science should now, in modern times, be 'discovering' nature's myriad physical and mental health benefits. We would suggest that being in nature, however small the amount of time, is second-nature... and a necessity for overall wellbeing.

Our earth, and the sentient beings which inhabit it, are poised at the edge of a confluence of interests which may result in utter devastation, or, may serve as a catalyst for positive change. We write for change, preservation, and conservation.

Human + Kind

Humankind is composed of two words. Lack of compassion and respect for those around us—as well as those who share our globe—increasingly permeate actions and interactions, making one question the words human and kind, let alone humankind

 

We must pause, reflect, and remember that we are all existing in this human state together. Not you, me, them—but ALL of us. Our differences are wonderful, to be appreciated and admired; our similarities, even more so. 

  • Traditions, beliefs, perspectives

  • Ethics, compassion

  • Women: rights, roles, health

  • Humankind, world cultures